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Benefits of College

College can be a life-changing experience, especially for differently abled students. Not only does it help strengthen self-advocacy and independence, but it can open new doors of opportunity.

According to a recent study, individuals with intellectual disabilities enrolled in college-level education are being employed at higher rates than ever before. The Transition and Postsecondary Program for Students with Intellectual Disability, model demonstration programs similar to IHECP, found that:

  • After exiting the program, 50% of students were employed (compared to 27% at the start).
  • 52% of enrolled students had never held a paid job prior to enrolling.
  • 61% of these students had a paying job one year after exiting the program – compared to 17% of adults with an intellectual or developmental disability who had not participated in inclusive higher education.
  • Another study found that individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) who receive post-secondary education services are also paid more on average than their peers:
  • Youths with disabilities who do not attend post-secondary education make, on average, about $200 per week.
  • Youths with disabilities who receive post-secondary education made, on average, about $288 per week.
  • Youths with disabilities who receive post-secondary education and vocational rehabilitation services made, on average, $302 per week.

The extra money for those who attend post-secondary classes and receive vocational rehabilitation support make $102 more per week, which works out to $5,304 more per year.

Currently, 100% of IHECP certificate earners are employed.

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